The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (2024)

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Written by Janice Monti Click to Read Full Biography Contributing Writer

Janice Monti's extensive publication record spans social science, popular culture, and race. After earning her Ph.D. from Carleton University, she taught sociology at Dominican University for over 30 years, where she held the Distinguished Service Pr...

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Written by NurseJournal Rankings Team Click to Read Full Biography Contributing Writer

The NurseJournal Rankings Team is made up of in-house editors, copy editors, and writers who create all of our nursing and healthcare rankings. Our editors calculate rankings based on a methodology that weighs factors we believe are most important to...

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Updated February 10, 2023

Discover the top states to work as a nurse based on salary, cost of living, diversity, employment opportunity, and much more.

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The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (15)

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The U.S. employs close to 3,000,000 registered nurses (RNs) earning average annual salaries just over $80,000. While employment prospects for healthcare workers remain promising across the country, some states offer nursing professionals greater job opportunities, more favorable work environments, and a better quality of life.

By comparing salaries, employment opportunities, cost of living, and levels of racial diversity in the workforce, nursing students and recent graduates can choose the best fit for their professional and personal needs.

Based on population and occupational data gathered from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and other sources, these rankings utilize a methodology that analyzes eight different metrics, weighted for each of the 50 states. More information about the variables and sources used to construct these rankings for the top states can be found at the end of this guide.

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The Top 10 States for Nurses

1. California

California offers a desirable place to live and work. Not only does it rank first among all 50 states for RN salaries, but California's rich tapestry of racial and ethnic groups forms one of the most diverse nursing workforces in the nation.

  • Weighted Average Score: 103.3
  • Average Annual RN Salary: $120,560
  • Cost of Living Index: 142.4
  • Projected RN Employment Growth: 16.7%
  • Nursing Workforce Diversity Index: 98.5

2. Washington

Washington's nurses earn higher average annual salaries than most other states, but they pay more for essentials, such as housing, transportation, and food. However, when adjusted for cost of living, nursing salaries remain close to the national average.

  • Weighted Average Score: 94.5
  • Average Annual RN Salary: $91,310
  • Cost of Living Index: 113
  • Projected RN Employment Growth: 20.5%
  • Nursing Workforce Diversity Index: 74.5

3. New York

New York offers something for everyone, from the excitement of the Big Apple to beautiful upstate landscapes. Nurses seeking to work in New York can expect one of the highest rates of job growth through 2030 and higher salaries than other parts of the country.

  • Weighted Average Score: 92
  • Average Annual RN Salary: $89,760
  • Cost of Living Index: 146.6
  • Projected RN Employment Growth: 24.6%
  • Nursing Workforce Diversity Index: 79.9

4. Texas

Nurses in Texas can find a promising job outlook, the opportunity to join a diverse workforce, and reasonable living expenses. The state ranks in the 90th percentile for RN salaries when adjusted for cost of living.

  • Weighted Average Score: 91.6
  • Average Annual RN Salary: $76,800
  • Cost of Living Index: 92
  • Projected RN Employment Growth: 16.8%
  • Nursing Workforce Diversity Index: 98.1

5. Arizona

The Grand Canyon state provides a welcoming environment for nurses. Arizona's growing population and popularity with retired baby boomers have contributed to expanding employment opportunities. Nursing salaries, adjusted for cost of living, rank among the top 10 of all 50 states.

  • Weighted Average Score: 91.3
  • Average Annual RN Salary: $80,380
  • Cost of Living Index: 101.3
  • Projected RN Employment Growth: 35%
  • Nursing Workforce Diversity Index: 73.3

6. Delaware

Although one of the smallest states in the nation, Delaware's location within the major northeastern metropolitan area makes it a desirable place to live and work as a nurse. However, RN salaries rank slightly lower than the national average.

  • Weighted Average Score: 90.1
  • Average Annual RN Salary: $74,330
  • Cost of Living Index: 107.7
  • Projected RN Employment Growth: 20%
  • Nursing Workforce Diversity Index: 57.9

7. Colorado

As Colorado's population ages, the demand for nurses continues to outstrip the supply. Job seekers can expect a projected RN employment rate of nearly 30% by the next decade. RN salaries rank 16th in the United States.

  • Weighted Average Score: 89.8
  • Average Annual RN Salary: $77,860
  • Cost of Living Index: 104.2
  • Projected RN Employment Growth: 29.5%
  • Nursing Workforce Diversity Index: 33.1

8. Massachusetts

Massachusetts remains one of the best states to work as a nurse. Nurses in the Bay State earn the fourth highest average RN salary in the nation, which helps to offset the relatively high cost of living.

  • Weighted Average Score: 89.6
  • Average Annual RN Salary: $96,250
  • Cost of Living Index: 129.9
  • Projected RN Employment Growth: 8.2%
  • Nursing Workforce Diversity Index: 61.9

9. Maryland

Strong employment prospects contribute to Maryland's ranking among the top 10 best states. Projections estimate a large increase in RNs over the next decade with one of the highest rates of open positions per population.

  • Weighted Average Score: 89.5
  • Average Annual RN Salary: $81,590
  • Cost of Living Index: 127.2
  • Projected RN Employment Growth: 21.7%
  • Nursing Workforce Diversity Index: 78.7

10. Nevada

Nevada attracts nursing professionals because of its rapid employment growth, racially diverse workforce, and high salaries. Although RNs may find living in Nevada more expensive than other places, their salary levels, when adjusted for cost of living, rank second in the nation.

  • Weighted Average Score: 89.3
  • Average Annual RN Salary: $89,750
  • Cost of Living Index: 108.8
  • Projected RN Employment Growth: 22.3%
  • Nursing Workforce Diversity Index: 100

The Best States for Nursing Salaries

According to the 2020 Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics Report released by the BLS, RNs earn a mean annual salary of $80,010. While relatively high compared to other healthcare workers, RN earnings vary considerably by degree level, work experience, specialties, and geographic location. The lowest 10% make $53,410 a year, while the highest 90% receive $116,230.

This table reports the top 10 states with the highest RN salaries adjusted for cost of living. California takes the lead among the best states for nurses seeking a place to live and work. In the states with the lowest compensation (e.g., Alabama, Iowa, and South Dakota), RNs earn $60,000 or less a year.

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (17)
RankState NameAverage RN SalaryCost of Living Index
1California$120,560142.4
2Nevada$91,310113
3Massachusetts$89,750108.8
4Washington$96,250129.9
5Oregon$95,270127.3
6Alaska$96,230133.7
7Minnesota$80,960100.7
8New Jersey$85,720116.8
9Arizona$80,380101.3
10Texas$76,80092

Although employers generally tie salaries to the cost of living, job seekers should carefully consider the amount of money needed to cover essentials for themselves and/or their families, including housing, transportation, utilities, taxes, food, and childcare. For example, California tops the list for both the highest RN annual wages and cost of living. For some nurses, the exceptionally high annual salary of $120,560 may offset living expenses.

Significant differences emerge when looking at salaries in relation to living expenses in specific areas within states. While California's overall cost of living ranks 42.4% above the national average, the cost of living in the major urban center of San Francisco is 86.1% higher than the average. In contrast, the smaller city of Fresno offers more affordable living costs, 2.4% below the national average. Other states in the top 10 may offer nurses lower annual salaries between $76,800 and $96,000 but with significantly lower cost of living indices than California.

The States With the Largest Projected Employment Growth

Several factors contribute to the projected RN employment growth between 2019 and 2029, including demographic transitions, healthcare reform, and changes in the nursing profession.

As the U.S. population ages, more aging citizens seek primary and preventive healthcare services, while some areas of the country experience nursing shortages. According to the 2019 AMN Healthcare Survey, 86% of nurses over the age of 55 plan to retire within five years, draining the workforce of its most experienced and specialized professionals. As a result of the Affordable Care Act, previously uninsured Americans have gained access to healthcare services, impacting the demand for registered nurses.

At the same time, already overburdened nursing programs face challenges training a new generation of nurses in sufficient numbers to fill the unmet need.

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (18)
RankState NameProjected RN Employment Growth
1Arizona35%
2Colorado29.5%
3Utah28.2%
4New York24.6%
5Georgia22.5%
6Nevada22.3%
7Maryland21.7%
8Washington20.5%
9Delaware20%
10Idaho19.9%

In each of the top 10 states with the highest RN employment growth, demographic shifts emerge as the most significant force pushing the demand for nurses. Because people over the age of 65 have higher rates of healthcare utilization, the projected RN job growth remains higher in states with a large percentage of elderly residents. Delaware's senior citizens comprise 16.3% of the state's population, closely followed by Arizona at 15.9%. The U.S. average stands at 14% for the total population.

The population growth rate for young adults between the ages of 25 and 29 in Utah, Washington, Arizona, Delaware, and Colorado ranks higher than the national average. As these millennials enter the workforce and raise families, they will need primary and preventive healthcare services.

These states also deal with rising retirement and turnover vacancies. Georgia's current nursing shortage has reached a crisis level, especially in public health where the lower salaries hinder both the recruitment and retention of quality nursing professionals.

The States With the Most Racially Diverse Nursing Workforce

A diverse and inclusive nursing workforce fosters quality care for all patients regardless of their race or ethnicity. Nursing education increasingly emphasizes the importance of cultural competency, preparing graduates to work effectively with individuals from all backgrounds. For healthcare employers, a diverse workforce that reflects the demographics of their patient community enhances communication and improves services.

These rankings use data from the U.S. Current Population Survey and Simpson's Diversity Index that measures the presence of racial groups within organizations. Hispanics or Latinos make up only 7.9% of the RN workforce compared to 17.6% in all other U.S. occupations. African Americans comprise 13.4%, marginally above their 12.1% national employment level. The 8.7% rate for Asian RNs slightly exceeds their 6.4% national rate across all occupations.

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (19)
RankState NameSimpson’s Diversity Index
1Nevada71.7
2Hawaii70.7
3California70.6
4Texas70.3
5Washington D.C.65.2
6New Mexico61.8
7New Jersey60.8
8Florida58.8
9New York57.2
10Maryland56.4

The states with the most racially diverse workforces have made some progress attracting nursing personnel that more closely reflects the diversity in their populations. However, white females still dominate the workforce and represent the majority of nursing school graduates. Nurses who identify as Asian are slightly overrepresented compared to their percentage in the overall U.S. population.

According to the nursing advocacy group Campaign for Action, Hispanics or Latinos make up almost a third of Nevada's population but only 14% of its nursing school graduates. Hispanics or Latinos in California and Texas represent less than 30% of nursing school graduates, although they comprise over 39% of the population in each of these states.

Nursing graduates in Nevada who identify as African Americans have not increased beyond 4.2% between 2011 and 2018, although they form 9% of the total state population. In Texas, where African Americans make up 12% of the population, the percentage of nursing graduates has dropped from 12.2% to 11.4% since 2011.

The Complete Ranking of the Best States to Work as a Nurse

Employment prospects for nursing professionals at all levels in every state have been affected by several national trends. These include demographic shifts, the growth in the aging population, economic conditions, expanded healthcare coverage, and the availability of nursing graduates to fill vacancies resulting from turnovers and retirement.

Although the national nursing shortage has abetted somewhat over the last decade, job seekers just beginning their careers may encounter substantial variations in the demand for RNs. According to the National Center for Health Workforce Analysis, RNs can expect deficits in some states and large variations in supply in other states.

Nurses can continue to find employment prospects across the United States. However, before making any decisions about where to live and work, they should carefully evaluate their opportunities in light of the information presented in this guide.

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (20)
RankState Name
1California
2Washington
3New York
4Texas
5Arizona
6Delaware
7Colorado
8Massachusetts
9Maryland
10Nevada
11Georgia
12New Jersey
13Illinois
14Minnesota
15Missouri
16Oregon
17New Mexico
18Hawaii
19Alaska
20Pennsylvania
21Florida
22South Dakota
23North Dakota
24North Carolina
25Connecticut
26Michigan
27Nebraska
28Virginia
29Washington, D.C.
30Rhode Island
31Utah
32Alabama
33Indiana
34Oklahoma
35Ohio
36New Hampshire
37West Virginia
38Arkansas
39South Carolina
40Wisconsin
41Iowa
42Tennessee
43Wyoming
44Kentucky
45Kansas
46Montana
47Idaho
48Maine
49Vermont
50Louisiana
51Mississippi

Methodology and Sources

The best states to work as a nurse were determined using a weighted average ranking across eight different metrics, including RN salary adjusted for cost of living, racial and ethnic diversity among the nursing workforce, projected annual RN openings per population, projected RN employment growth, NCLEX-RN pass rate, patient hospital rating, RN nursing supply and demand, and RN location quotient. Each state received an index score where the best performing state was assigned a value of 100. Indices were then weighted and averaged across states.

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (21)

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (22)

RN Salary Adjusted for Cost of Living

How much are nurses paid and how much of their salary do they keep after adjusting for common expenses such as housing, transportation, and utilities?

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (23)

Projected RN Employment Growth

By how much is employment of registered nurses projected to increase in each state?

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (24)

Racial and Ethnic Diversity Among Nursing Workforce

How much representation is present for nurses of difference races and ethnicities?

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (25)

Nursing Supply and Demand

Which states have the greatest need for new nurses?

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (26)

Patient Hospital Rating

Which states receive the most favorable reviews from patients?

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (27)

Projected Annual RN Openings per Population

How competitive are openings for RNs based on each state's total population?

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (28)

NCLEX-RN Pass Rate

What is the first-time pass rate for new RNs applying for licensure in each state?

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (29)

RN Location Quotient

What is each state's share of total RN employment compared to the nation as a whole?

Sources include Projections Central, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Health Resources & Services Administration, National Council of State Boards of Nursing, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the United States Census Bureau.

Average RN salary, total RN employment, and RN location quotient were collected from the BLS' 2020 Occupational Employment Survey.

RN salary adjusted for cost of living was calculated using the average 2020 RN nursing salary per state adjusted for the cost of living index per state according to meric.mo.gov.

Racial and ethnic diversity among the nursing workforce was calculated using Simpson's Diversity Index with data from the U.S. Current Population Survey for nursing occupations from 2016 to 2020.

RN nursing supply and demand was calculated using the 2017 Health Resources & Services Administration's Supply and Demand Projections of the Nursing Workforce: 2014-2030. States were indexed by projected 2030 registered nurse demand, where the states with the greatest demand received a score of 100.

Data for patient hospital ratings use the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Patient Survey updated on December 10th, 2020. States were indexed by the percentage of patients who gave their hospital a rating of 9 or 10 on a scale from 0 (lowest) to 10 (highest).

Data for projected RN employment growth and projected annual RN openings per population are from ProjectionsCentral.com for 2018-2028. Data was unavailable for Louisiana.

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org (2024)

FAQs

The Best States To Work As A Nurse | NurseJournal.org? ›

1. California

With an average salary of $124,000 annually, the Golden State takes the prize for being the highest-paying state for registered nurses.

What is the best state to move as a nurse? ›

Projections Central estimates the job outlook (projected number of positions available) for nurses between 2020 and 2030 is greatest in the following states:
  • California: 21,200 projected positions.
  • Texas: 16,210 projected positions.
  • New York: 14,430 projected positions.
  • Florida: 13,250 projected positions.
Apr 25, 2023

What state pays nurses the most? ›

1. California

With an average salary of $124,000 annually, the Golden State takes the prize for being the highest-paying state for registered nurses.

What is the best and worst state for nurses to work in? ›

Washington is the best state for nurses while Hawaii is the worst, according to personal finance site WalletHub. In a report released May 2, WalletHub determined the best and worst states for nurses. The site compared the states across two dimensions: opportunity and competition, and work environment.

What state has the happiest nurses? ›

Top Happiest 5 states for nurses in the US
  • #5 Colorado. Quality of life ranking: #10. Average RN salary: $69,990.00. ...
  • #4 Alaska. Quality of life ranking: #19. Average RN salary: $88,510.00. ...
  • #3 Oregon. Quality of life ranking: #18. ...
  • #2 Wisconsin. Quality of life ranking: #3. ...
  • #1 Minnesota. Quality of life ranking: #2.

What state is the cheapest for nurses to live? ›

Highest-paying states for RNs, adjusted for cost of living

As of 2021, Hawaii tops the list at 119.3, while Mississippi comes in lowest, at 87.8. Adjusting each state's average RN salary by its cost of living index gives us a potentially more accurate means of comparing where nurses get paid the most.

Where is the best place for a nurse to work? ›

1. Hospitals. Around 61% of RNs find employment at state, private, and local hospitals. RNs who work in hospitals often perform a variety of tasks and care for different patients each day.

What is the highest paid RN? ›

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist: $202,470

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) earn a nationwide average of $202,470 per year according to the BLS; this makes CRNAs the highest-paying type nursing job by a significant margin.

What city pays nurses the most? ›

This makes San Jose the highest-paying city for nurses as of May 2021 (according to the BLS). In the United States, the average salary for RNs is $82,750. Additionally, the median (50th percentile) is $77,600. Over $100,000 lower than the San Jose's average nurse salary is Decatur, AL, at $54,410.

Where is the hardest place to work as a nurse? ›

Most Stressful Nursing Positions
  • Intensive Care Unit (ICU) nurses. ICU is an extremely high-pressure environment and these nurses work with patients who have significant injuries and disease with added morbidity risks. ...
  • Emergency Department nurses. ...
  • Neonatal ICU. ...
  • OR nursing. ...
  • Oncology Nursing. ...
  • Psychiatric Nursing.
Jan 27, 2021

What states are in nursing crisis? ›

California has the worst nursing shortage in the United States. It's predicted that by 2030, California will be in need of over 44,000 nurses. Other states with major hospital staff shortages include New Mexico, Vermont, Rhode Island, West Virginia, and Arizona.

What is the most stressful nursing field? ›

The most stressful nursing jobs include ICU nurse, ER nurse, and NICU nurse. In these roles, nurses work in an intense environment with high stakes. They manage emergency situations and care for critically ill patients. Other stressful nursing jobs include OR nursing, oncology nursing, and psychiatric nursing.

Where is the easiest place to be a nurse? ›

Easy-to-get-into nursing jobs can be found in extended care facilities. Nursing homes, rehab facilities, and assisted living all fall under this umbrella. Although you should be able to find a job in many of these environments, working in an assisted living facility may be your best option.

What state is the easiest to become a nurse? ›

Easiest states to become a nurse – Length of licensing process
  • Maine: 1-2 weeks.
  • Maryland: 2-3 days.
  • Missouri: 2 weeks.
  • Nevada: 1-2 weeks.
  • North Carolina: 1-2 weeks.
  • North Dakota: 1-2 weeks.
  • Texas: 2 weeks.
  • Vermont: 3-5 business days.

What state has the strictest nursing laws? ›

California is the only state in the U.S. to legally require a specific nurse-to-patient ratio in every hospital unit.

What is the easiest nursing job that pays well? ›

What is the easiest nursing job that pays well? One of the highest-paying nursing positions is nurse administrator. These managers are responsible for hiring, training and evaluating their team of nurses.

Who hires the most nurses? ›

Industry profile for Registered Nurses:
IndustryEmployment (1)Percent of industry employment
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals1,724,51030.85
Offices of Physicians208,7607.50
Home Health Care Services173,64011.31
Outpatient Care Centers152,12014.87
1 more row

What is the easiest nurse to become? ›

An LPN or LVN program usually takes around a year to complete, according to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). What makes an LPN or LVN preparation program the easiest type of nursing education you can pursue is its focus on training for basic nursing services only and its quick completion time.

Where are the lowest paid nurses? ›

Here is a look at the five worst states to live in as a nurse because of their low pay scales:
  • South Dakota nurse pay is the bottom of the barrel at $52,090 a year Iowa nurses earn $53,220 a year.
  • Alabama nurses make $54,900 annually.
  • Mississippi nursing jobs earn $54,940 a year.
  • West Virginia nurses make $55,310 annually.

What state needs travel nurses the most? ›

According to Travelnursing.com, California has the highest need for travel nurses, and this will continue until 2030. California has specific laws regarding safe nurse-to-patient ratios so there will always be an increased need for nurses.

What are the least paying nurses? ›

Licensed vocational nurses (LVN) and licensed practical nurses (LPN) are some of the lowest-paid nursing roles, but that is due to the fact that the educational requirements are less than most other types of nurses.

How to make $100 000 as a nurse? ›

HOW TO MAKE SIX FIGURES AS A NURSE?
  1. Become a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) ...
  2. Become a Nurse Practitioner (NP) ...
  3. Become a Nurse Midwife. ...
  4. Advance in Nurse Leadership. ...
  5. Begin travel nursing assignment. ...
  6. Change Nursing specialties. ...
  7. Relocate to a higher paying state. ...
  8. Make sacrifices.

What type of nursing is in demand? ›

What type of RN is most in demand? All RNs are in demand more than other occupations. The BLS projects 6% job growth for all RNs between 2021 and2031, compared to 5% job growth for all occupations. Some specialties that are in especially high demand are neonatal nursing, surgical nursing, and critical care nursing.

Can nurses make 200k? ›

In the last 2 years, I have made an extraordinary amount of money – for a nurse. In fact, my income level of more than $200,000 puts me in the top 0.01% of nurses in this country AND the top 2% of wage earners in the entire state of Pennsylvania. I made every cent of this income by working as a NursePreneur.

What setting do nurses make the most money? ›

Highest Paid Nursing Jobs:
  • Family Nurse – $113,000.
  • Urgent Care Nurse – $113,000.
  • Oncology Nurse – $113,000.
  • Orthopedic Nurse – $115,000.
  • Cardiac Nurse – $116,000.
  • Emergency Room Nurse – $116,000.
  • Neonatal Nurse – $127,000.
  • Nurse Anesthetist – $189,000.
Dec 11, 2022

Why are nurses getting paid so much? ›

Nurses are in high demand

This also means that nurses have a great number of choices in terms of where they want to live. The medical field in general has many roles that are in very high demand, and as a result, the pay for these roles is often good.

What part of Florida pays nurses the most? ›

Highest paying cities in Florida for registered nurses

Florida nursing salaries vary from region to region across the state. The area where registered nurses are paid the highest is Miami, where the average RNs salary is $74,220 and 53,110 registered nurses are currently employed.

Which nurses have the most burnout? ›

Critical care nurses suffer the highest rates of burnout.

This is mainly due to the nature of the job, as critical care nurses work specialize in the emergency department (ED) and intensive care unit (ICU). As such, their work environment is constantly fast-paced, meticulous, and demanding.

What type of nurse is the least stressful? ›

Institutional Nurses

These nurses administer more basic care and typically don't have to work long hours and overnight shifts, so this field of nursing tends to be low-stress. Even with less excitement, these nurses find fulfillment in providing basic and family care to those in need.

Where are the happiest nurses in the world? ›

Norway, a Scandinavian country known as the land of Fjords, has one of the highest standards of living in the world as well as job satisfaction for nurses.

Why are so many nurses quitting? ›

Staffing shortages were the top reason nurses cited for planning to leave their jobs, followed by needing better work-life balance, the survey out Tuesday said. Nurses also said they planned to leave their roles because their mental health is at risk and they feel a lack of appreciation.

What is the average age of a nurse? ›

Average Age Of Nurses

The average age of a registered nurse in the United States is 44, though this may change as the demand for nurses increases.

Why is there a nurse shortage 2023? ›

The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated these shortages to crisis levels, with demand for nurses outpacing supply in nearly every region.

What is the hardest thing as a nurse? ›

Here are some of the challenges nurses face in their profession:
  1. Long shifts. Nurses often work 10- or 12-hour shifts. ...
  2. Changing schedules. ...
  3. Emotional involvement. ...
  4. Physical demands. ...
  5. Exposure to illness and chemicals. ...
  6. Lack of nurses. ...
  7. Changing technology. ...
  8. Poor treatment from patients.
Mar 10, 2023

What is the most demanding nursing specialty? ›

The Highest-Demand Nursing Specialties
  • Neonatal Nurse. Babies who are born prematurely commonly experience a variety of health issues early on, and this is where a neonatal nurse comes in. ...
  • Clinical Nurse. ...
  • Dialysis Nurse. ...
  • Nurse Practitioner. ...
  • Nurse Advocate.

Are nurses more stressed than doctors? ›

Both doctors and nurses are equally stressed (p = 0.364).

What state has the highest NCLEX pass rate? ›

1. New Hampshire. New Hampshire boasts the highest NCLEX pass rate average in the U.S., over 14% higher than the national average. In 2022, five of the state's eight bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) programs reported first-time pass rates above 90%, including a 100% rate for Plymouth State University.

Which state has unlimited NCLEX exam? ›

Ohio: Unlimited attempts. New York: Unlimited attempts. Canada: 3 attempts maximum.

Which state has the hardest NCLEX exam? ›

None. There is no “easy” state to take the NCLEX. The NCLEX is a national exam administered by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN). Because it's national, the NCLEX will be the same regardless of what state you choose to take it in.

What is the most sued area of nursing? ›

Death remains the most common patient injury that results in a lawsuit. It accounts for 40.9% of all malpractice claims against nurses. Patient injuries that resulted in higher-than-average losses, and more unfavorable outcomes for insured nurses, included brain injuries, paralysis, and amputation.

Does Texas pay nurses well? ›

As of Jun 21, 2023, the average hourly pay for a Registered Nurse in Texas is $41.06 an hour.

What state is the best for labor and delivery nurses? ›

The highest-paid labor and delivery nurses work in California where they make 50 percent more than the average salary of a labor and delivery nurse nationwide.

What state is the easiest to become an RN? ›

Easiest states to become a nurse – Length of licensing process
  • Maine: 1-2 weeks.
  • Maryland: 2-3 days.
  • Missouri: 2 weeks.
  • Nevada: 1-2 weeks.
  • North Carolina: 1-2 weeks.
  • North Dakota: 1-2 weeks.
  • Texas: 2 weeks.
  • Vermont: 3-5 business days.

What state has the least amount of nurses? ›

California has the worst nursing shortage in the United States. It's predicted that by 2030, California will be in need of over 44,000 nurses. Other states with major hospital staff shortages include New Mexico, Vermont, Rhode Island, West Virginia, and Arizona.

What type of RN is most in demand? ›

What type of RN is most in demand? All RNs are in demand more than other occupations. The BLS projects 6% job growth for all RNs between 2021 and2031, compared to 5% job growth for all occupations. Some specialties that are in especially high demand are neonatal nursing, surgical nursing, and critical care nursing.

What type of RN makes the most? ›

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) earn a nationwide average of $202,470 per year according to the BLS; this makes CRNAs the highest-paying type nursing job by a significant margin.

What is the most stressful nursing job? ›

The most stressful nursing jobs include ICU nurse, ER nurse, and NICU nurse. In these roles, nurses work in an intense environment with high stakes. They manage emergency situations and care for critically ill patients. Other stressful nursing jobs include OR nursing, oncology nursing, and psychiatric nursing.

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Name: Mr. See Jast

Birthday: 1999-07-30

Address: 8409 Megan Mountain, New Mathew, MT 44997-8193

Phone: +5023589614038

Job: Chief Executive

Hobby: Leather crafting, Flag Football, Candle making, Flying, Poi, Gunsmithing, Swimming

Introduction: My name is Mr. See Jast, I am a open, jolly, gorgeous, courageous, inexpensive, friendly, homely person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.